February 17, 2017

Dr. Wynne is out of the office. His column will return next week when he does.

Joshua Wynne, MD, MBA, MPH
UND Vice President for Health Affairs
Dean UND School of Medicine and Health Sciences

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Recent Educational Policies to Review

Standards of Capacity (for medical students)

View all of the School's Policies and Procedures.

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Enej Gasevic will present today's Surgery Grand Rounds

Enej Gasevic, MD, associate program director and assistant professor of surgery, will be presenting his talk titled "“Ballistic Trauma for Surgeon” from Clinic B2 at Sanford Health in Fargo today, February 17, from 8:00 to 9:00 a.m.

The objectives of his talk are the following:

  1. Recognize the types of firearms that are responsible for the penetrating traumatic injuries presenting to civilian practice.
  2. Understand terminal ballistics as relevant to the practice of medicine.
  3. Describe the scope of the problem in our healthcare associated with the above injuries.
  4. Explain how to avoid legal pitfalls associated with treating victims of ballistic trauma.

This Surgery Grand Rounds Conference, sponsored by the UND School of Medicine and Health Sciences Department of Surgery, is broadcasted via videoconference to many sites in North Dakota and Minnesota.

All are welcome to attend.

Geralyn Lunski, AAS
Administrative Assistant
Conference & Faculty Coordinator
Department of Surgery

Thomas L. Schwenk, MD, presents next Dean's Hour on February 23

Thomas L. Schwenk, MD, professor of Family Medicine, dean of the School of Medicine and vice president of Health Sciences at the University of Nevada, Reno, is the next Dean's Hour Speaker at noon on Thursday, February 23, in the Charles H. Fee, MD, Auditorium (E101) at the SMHS in Grand Forks. The title of his presentation is “Mental Illness in Medical Students and Residents—The Crisis and Some Possible Solutions.”  

Lunch will be provided on the Grand Forks Campus. If you plan to attend on the Grand Forks Campus, please let us know by responding at the following link https://und.qualtrics.com/SE/?SID=SV_bNS8s4BptKDQXjL

This presentation will be broadcast to the following UND SMHS campus sites:

  • Bismarck, Southwest Campus, Room 2108.
  • Fargo, Southeast Campus, Room 219.
  • Minot, Northwest Campus Office–Trinity Location.

Also available at your desktop at the following link: http://Bit.ly/deans-hour.

For additional information, contact the Office of the Dean at (701) 777-2514.

Joshua Wynne presents Dean's Hour on March 2

Joshua Wynne, MD, MBA, MPH, vice president for Health Affairs; dean, UND School of Medicine and Health Sciences; and cardiologist, Sanford Health and Altru Health System, is the Dean's Hour Speaker at noon on Thursday, March 2, in the Charles H. Fee, MD, Auditorium (E101) at the SMHS in Grand Forks. The title of his presentation is “Practical Electrocardiography: Arrhythmias.”  

Lunch will be provided on the Grand Forks Campus. If you plan to attend on the Grand Forks Campus, please let us know by responding at the following link https://und.qualtrics.com/SE/?SID=SV_8HBAqFbJ0LzDqiF:

This presentation will be broadcast to the following UND SMHS campus sites:

  • Bismarck, Southwest Campus, Room 2108.
  • Fargo, Southeast Campus, Room 219.
  • Minot, Northwest Campus Office–Trinity Location.

Also available at your desktop at the following link: http://Bit.ly/deans-hour.

For additional information, contact the Office of the Dean at (701) 777-2514.

Save the Date: Frank Low Research Day is Thursday, April 6

Frank Low Research Day is Thursday, April 6, at the SMHS in Grand Forks.

Students and faculty in biomedical sciences, health sciences, and clinical departments are encouraged to participate in the poster presentations.

Joann Johnson
Frank Low Research Day Coordinator

Zen in 10 continues

Zen in 10 focuses on stretching, breathing, and having fun with coworkers. Go back to work with less stress, more energy, and better body functioning.

Sessions are from 9:00 a.m. to 9:10 a.m. on Tuesdays and Thursdays, February 21 through March 16, in the Charles H. Fee, MD, Auditorium (E101) at the SMHS in Grand Forks.

Please note:

  • There will be no Zen in 10 on February 28 or March 2.
  • The session on March 7 will be held in Room W201.

Services provided by Kay Williams, Certified Yoga and Relax and Renew Instructor®.

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Fargo’s SIM-ND team receives award

The Rural Cass County Ambulance and Rescue Association honored Fargo’s Simulation In Motion–North Dakota (SIM-ND) team with the Jerry Decker Award on February 15 for their outstanding dedication to rural emergency medical service (EMS) in Cass County in 2016. The award ceremony was held at F-M Ambulance Service in Fargo.    

In the photo, from the left, are Missy Misealek, Sanford Fargo site coordinator for SIM-ND; Amy Malheim, SIM–ND and Simulation Center administrative director; and Ryan Telford, Essentia site coordinator.

Jerry Decker was a volunteer with Hunter Ambulance Service. In 1992, Decker responded to a cardiac call; while he was transporting the patient, he suffered a heart attack and died. Decker’s life was filled with the need to help others; he was instrumental in recruiting members for the Hunter Ambulance squad and was also a peace officer and a firefighter. The award was created in his honor and is given out annually to people or organizations who impact rural EMS in Cass County.

SIM-ND is a collaboration between many hospitals in North Dakota, including Essentia Health and Sanford Health, and the University of North Dakota School of Medicine and Health Sciences to bring emergency care education to rural areas. SIM-ND, which was made possible in part by a grant from the Leona M. and Harry B. Helmsley Charitable Trust, is a statewide, mobile education system using high-fidelity human patient simulators that talk, breathe, have heartbeats, and can react to medications and other actions to train pre-hospital and hospital personnel. Training is focused on low-frequency-high-mortality encounters along with critically ill and injured patients. Training is performed in a safe setting, which allows for repeated practice with feedback. SIM-ND’s goal is to improve emergency care skills of North Dakota emergency care providers.

You can view Malheim's interview on KVLY's Valley News Live "Fargo's SIM-ND team receives award."

Nominations sought for Kupchella Preventive Medicine and Wellness Awards

Nominations are being sought for the Charles E. Kupchella Preventive Medicine and Wellness Awards.

The awards recognize the achievements of an individual and an organization who have worked to improve health and wellness through lowered rates of disease and disability by developing and delivering effective health promotion and prevention initiatives.

Named for former University of North Dakota (UND) President Charles E. Kupchella, the twelfth-annual Kupchella Preventive Medicine and Wellness Awards will be presented Sunday, May 14, at 10:30 a.m., during the University of North Dakota School of Medicine and Health Sciences MD Class of 2017 commencement awards brunch at the Alerus Center in Grand Forks.

UND is seeking nominations of individuals and organizations in North Dakota and surrounding states who have contributed significantly to disease prevention and healthful living. Consideration will be given to those who have made significant contributions in the field of health promotion and disease prevention, including the clinical, education and research areas; demonstrated excellence in a function or on a project related to prevention or health promotion; taken initiative, shown innovativeness or persistence, had an effect or made a difference in prevention or health promotion for rural Americans.

Projects may address one or more of the goals and focus areas outlined in the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services' "Healthy People 2020." See www.healthypeople.gov or call (800) 336-4797 for more information.

Areas of special interest are promotion of physical activity, reduction of overweight or obesity, reduction or elimination of tobacco use, reduction or elimination of substance abuse, promotion of responsible sexual behavior, or reduction or elimination of injury and violence.

The nomination should briefly address the following: Why should this individual or organization be considered for this award? What are the key outcomes and achievements of the program, policy, contribution, or initiative? Describe the nominee's accomplishments. A résumé or CV and up to three letters of support may be included.

Emphasis will be given to programs that demonstrate creativity and innovation, leadership, sustainability, replicability, and effectiveness.

The nomination letter and supporting materials are due by 5 p.m., March 24, 2017, in the Office of the Dean, UND School of Medicine and Health Sciences, 1301 N. Columbia Road, Stop 9037, Grand Forks, ND 58202-9037.

The award recipients will each receive a $500 cash award and a commemorative plate. Pictures of the recipients will be displayed on a plaque at the UND School of Medicine and Health Sciences.

The awards have been made possible by a gift to the UND Foundation from the late Manuchair Ebadi, former senior adviser to the president and associate vice president for health affairs and medical research at UND, and associate dean for research and program development at the UND School of Medicine and Health Sciences.

For more information, contact the Office of the Dean at the UND School of Medicine and Health Sciences, (701) 777-2516.

Nominate a faculty member for the 2017 Leonard Tow Humanism in Medicine Award

Please consider nominating a medical school faculty member (MD or DO) or a fourth year medical student (chosen from the ten medical student members below) or both for the 2017 Leonard Tow Humanism in Medicine Award presented by the Arnold P. Gold Foundation. Nominations are due March 6, 2017. See the following for more information.

The Arnold P. Gold Foundation (Gold Foundation) initiated the Humanism in Medicine Awards in 1991 to recognize a graduating medical student and a faculty member at Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons. These awards were intended to spur dialogue, debate, and activities at medical schools committed to training physicians who are as compassionate as they are scientifically proficient. Over 150 medical schools currently participate in this program, now officially named for its benefactor: The Leonard Tow Humanism in Medicine Awards presented by The Arnold P. Gold Foundation.

Each year, Leonard Tow Humanism in Medicine Awards are presented to a graduating student and faculty member (MD or DO) at over 150 of the nation’s medical schools. This award is given to those who best demonstrate the Foundation’s ideals of outstanding compassion in the delivery of care; respect for patients, their families, and healthcare colleagues; and clinical excellence.

The following are the award criteria for nominating a medical school faculty member:

It is suggested that you consider the following criteria for identifying awardees, specifically “I. E., CARES”—Integrity, Excellence, Compassion, Altruism, Respect, Empathy, Service.

Medical School Faculty Member (MD or DO)

  • Consistently demonstrates compassion and empathy in the delivery of care to patients
  • Serves as a role model—illustrates professional behavior by example
  • Approachable and accessible to students
  • Welcomes opportunities for teaching and one-on-one mentorships with students
  • Exhibits enthusiasm and skill in professional and personal interactions with students
  • Shows respect for everyone
  • Demonstrates cultural sensitivity in working with patients and family members of diverse backgrounds
  • Displays effective communication and listening skills
  • Understands patient's need for interpretation of complex medical diagnoses and treatments and makes an effort to ensure patient's comprehension—shows respect for the patient's viewpoint
  • Sensitive to the patient's psychological well-being
  • Effectively identifies emotional concerns of patients and family members
  • Engenders trust and confidence
  • Adheres to professional and ethical standards
  • Committed to reflection and objective self-evaluation of his or her skills
  • Displays competence in scientific endeavors

Faculty award recipients from the previous five years are not eligible: Michael LeBeau, MD (2016); David A. Billings, MD (2015); Roger Schauer, MD (2014); Charles E. Christianson, MD (2013); and Myra Quanrud, MD (2012). 

The similar criteria for the medical student awardee are as follows:   

Graduating Medical Student

  • Consistently demonstrates compassion and empathy in the delivery of care to patients
  • Illustrates professional and ethical behavior by example
  • Shows respect for everyone
  • Demonstrates cultural sensitivity in working with patients and family members of diverse backgrounds
  • Displays effective communication and listening skills—good rapport with patients
  • Understands patient's need for interpretation of complex medical diagnosis and treatment and makes an effort to assure patient comprehension—shows respect for the patient's viewpoint
  • Helps to articulate the patient's concerns to attending physicians and others
  • Sensitive to the patient's psychological well-being
  • Cooperative, easy to work with—engenders trust and confidence
  • Willing to help others and, when necessary, willing to seek help from others
  • Displays concern for the general welfare of the community and engages in volunteer activities
  • Seeks and accepts criticism, using it to improve performance
  • Committed to reflection and objective self-evaluation of his or her skills
  • Displays competence in scientific endeavors

The awardee must be chosen from the fourth-year students who were inducted as student members of the Gold Humanism Honor Society on 6/20/16:

  • Rebecca Asp
  • Amy Borys
  • Marcus Geffre
  • Wesley Halseth
  • Heather Liebe
  • Brandon Potter
  • Kara Prussing
  • Kyle Rudningen
  • Hasanga Samaraweera
  • Mark Schlotterback

All nominations should include a brief statement of no more than one page describing the nominee’s qualifications. Faculty and students are encouraged to submit nominations. Nominations must be received by March 6, 2017. The recipient will be chosen from among nominations using a committee process. The award includes a personalized certificate and $1,000 to be presented at the School's Commencement Awards Luncheon on 5/14/17.

Please send nominations to 
Cindy Stromme
UND SMHS Student Affairs
1301 N. Columbia Road Stop 9037
Grand Forks, ND 58202-9037
cindy.stromme@med.und.edu

Blood drive is a success

The UND Student Social Work Association/Phi Alpha, UND Undergraduate Medical Association, and UND Medical Laboratory Science Club blood drive for National Blood Donor Month on Wednesday, Feb. 8, was a huge success.

"This is the best turnout we have ever had this time of the year at UND," said Monica Janssen, donor resource coordinator for Altru Health System–Dak-Minn Blood Bank. "We totaled 108 donors and collected 96 units! That is AWESOME!!"

Sponsor/Exhibit at the 2017 Dakota Conference

2017 Sponsor/Exhibitor Registration Now Open
June 13–15, 2017
Holiday Inn Riverside, Minot

On behalf of the Dakota Conference Planning Committee, you are invited to sponsor the 2017 Dakota Conference. Space is limited, so register now! We have additional options this year for sponsors. Choose the level that suits your needs!

Two ways to register:

Sponsor registration deadline is 11:59 p.m. CST Wednesday, March 1, 2017.

The Dakota Conference is Coordinated and Facilitated by
Center for Rural Health, University of North Dakota (UND) School of Medicine and Health Sciences (SMHS)

Supported by

Questions?
Contact Kylie Nissen or (701) 777-5380.

Social Media—Dean Wynne's healthful steps toward heart health

On our Facebook page, view the WDAZ TV interview with Dean Wynne: "A few steps for a healthier heart."

Also on our Facebook page, Dean Wynne answers questions about hardening of the arteries in his latest Health Matters column, which can be found in the Grand Forks Herald every other Monday. Please submit any general health-related questions to healthmatters@med.und.edu.

You can also get the latest SMHS news by following the School on Twitter

UND Today—Next step: NexusND

UND to initiate Grand Challenges effort with $3 million investment in technology infrastructure and workforce.

More information about this and other UND news can be found in UND Today, UND's official news source.

"Overcoming Barriers to Medication Adherence for Chronic Diseases"—CDC Grand Rounds

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's (CDC) Public Health Grand Rounds is a monthly webcast created to foster discussion on major public health issues. Each session focuses on key challenges related to a specific health topic, and explores the latest scientific evidence and the potential effect of different interventions. The Grand Rounds sessions also highlight how the CDC and its partners are already addressing these challenges and discuss the recommendations for future research and practice. February's presentation is "Overcoming Barriers to Medication Adherence for Chronic Diseases." All of the webcasts are archived for later viewing.

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UND scientists publish vade mecum to aid study of drug-resistant bacteria threat

Their names are mysterious and complex; the diseases they cause are well known. Scientists call them Yersinia pestis, Escherichia coli, Salmonella, Shigella, and Pseudomonas. The diseases they cause range from the plague to pneumonia to virulent food-borne illnesses.

Most make the Top-18 list of biggest threats to the United States from drug-resistant bacteria compiled by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. According to the CDC, “at least 2 million people become infected with bacteria that are resistant to antibiotics and at least 23,000 people die each year as a direct result of these infections.”

The search to prevent infections from these bacteria received a boost from biomedical scientists at the University of North Dakota School of Medicine and Health Sciences. Associate Professor Matthew L. Nilles, PhD, and Assistant Professor Danielle L. Jessen Condry, PhD, in the Department of Biomedical Sciences, have published a handbook or vade mecum to aid researchers in studying pathogenic bacteria.

Nilles and Jessen Condry are the editors of Type 3 Secretion Systems: Methods and Protocols. The book discusses techniques to study a method some bacteria use to infect human cells. Nilles and Jessen Condry also contributed to several chapters in the book. The book draws on contributions from scientists across Europe and the United States.

Other contributors from the UND SMHS Department of Biomedical Sciences are Associate Professor David S. Bradley, PhD, and graduate students Travis D. Alvine and Peter L. Knopick. Former members of the Nilles lab also contributed chapters, including Patrick Osei-Owusu, PhD, Thomas A. Henderson, PhD, and Melody Toosky, PhD, who provided the cover art for the book.

Certain bacteria use a unique burglar’s tool to break in and enter cells; it is known as a type 3 secretion (T3S) system. T3S systems are used by pathogenic bacteria to inject toxins directly into cells to change cell behavior.

In the book, Nilles and Jessen Condry say, “Type III secretion (T3S) systems are found in a large number of gram-negative bacteria, where they function to manipulate the biology of infected hosts.”

Gram-negative refers to a result from a laboratory technique used in the identification of bacteria. The family of gram-negative bacteria includes some of the most virulent and most drug-resistant threats to humans.

“We hope to provide other researchers with a starting toolbox to initiate or advance their work on T3S systems, potentially leading to a better understanding of the roles of T3S systems in bacterial-host interactions,” Nilles said.

A free preview of the book is available at the publisher’s website.

Rigor and Transparency in Research

To support the highest quality science, public accountability, and social responsibility in the conduct of science, the National Institutes of Health’s Rigor and Transparency efforts are intended to clarify expectations and highlight four areas that may need more explicit attention by applicants and reviewers:

  • Scientific premise
  • Scientific rigor
  • Consideration of relevant biological variables
  • Authentication of key biological and/or chemical resources

See notice NOT-OD-16-011 and other related announcements that are listed in this notice. 

Please note that reviewers are being asked to pay close attention to these items.

Diane Hillebrand, CRA
Grants Manager

New guidelines regarding the Vertebrate Animals Section of proposals

New guidelines regarding the Vertebrate Animals Section of proposals has been changed and is in place—NOT-OD-16-006. The changes were made to remove redundancy with the review of animal study protocols by Institutional Animal Care and Use Committees while still meeting the requirements of the Public Health Service Policy on Humane Care and Use of Laboratory Animals.

The Vertebrate Animals Section (VAS) has been simplified by the following changes:

  1. a description of veterinary care is no longer required;
  2. justification for the number of animals has been moved from the VAS; and
  3. the method of euthanasia has been moved from the VAS.

Mandatory PHS Financial Conflict of Interest Education sessions

The Public Health Service (PHS) has recently revised its policy for requiring all PHS grantees or those considering submitting to PHS complete a mandatory education class. According to the new policy, all grantees must be trained in Conflict of Interest every four years. The Division of Research & Economic Development will be conducting sessions on the following dates:

  • Monday, March 27, from 2:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. in the Memorial Union Presidents Room
  • Thursday, April 13, from 11:00 a.m. to noon in the Memorial Union Presidents Room

You only need to attend one of the sessions if you have not already done so. Training is necessary every four years. 

The sessions will be presented by Barry Milavetz, PhD, associate vice president for Research and Economic Development.

PHS agencies include

  • National Institutes of Health (NIH)
  • Food and Drug Administration (FDA)
  • Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)
  • Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ)
  • Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR)
  • Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA)
  • Indian Health Service (IHS)
  • Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA)

If you have questions, please contact Barry Milavetz, PhD, (701) 777-4151.  

Diane Hillebrand, CRA
Grants Manager

USDA GF Human Nutrition Research Center seeks study participants

The United States Department of Agriculture Grand Forks Human Nutrition Research Center is seeking participants for two research studies.

  • Fish for HEALTH! 
    Are you interested in cardiovascular health? Would you like to eat more fish? The USDA Human Nutrition Research Center is seeking men and women, ages 20–70, to determine whether eating rainbow trout with different omega-3 levels reduces heart disease risk markers. Receive up to $500 for completing the study.
  • Acute Effects of Fats on Satiety & Energy Needs
    Women on contraception: are you satisfied when you eat? The USDA is looking for female participants, ages 18–50, to join our study to assess how dietary fat affects energy metabolism and feelings of fullness after eating. Receive up to $530, or a 13-month individual membership, or a 9-month family membership at Choice Health & Fitness, to be paid at the conclusion of the study.

For more information, and to see if you qualify, check out our website, or contact Vanessa Thyne, Biological Laboratory Technician, Dietary Prevention of Disease Research Unit, Grand Forks Human Nutrition Research Center, (701) 795-8493.

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Library Resources hours for Presidents' Day holiday weekend

Library Resources hours for February 17 through February 20 are the following:

  • Friday, Feb. 17—7:30 a.m.–5 p.m.
  • Saturday, Feb. 18—Closed
  • Sunday, Feb. 19—Closed
  • Monday, Feb. 20, Presidents' Day—10 a.m.–8 p.m.

If you have any questions, please contact Kelly Thormodson (701) 777-4129.

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